Tag Archives: DRS

Two DRS zones for Australia

Melbourne will feature double DRS next week

Melbourne will feature double DRS next week

The first Grand Prix of the 2012 season in Melbourne will see the use of two DRS zones.

The first zone will be similar to last year. The detection zone will be located at Turn 14, while the activation zone will be down the start/finish straight.

However, the second zone activates almost immediately afterwards, from Turns 2 to 3.

Unlike several double DRS zones last year, these two activation points have separate detection areas.

Abu Dhabi to feature double DRS

Abu Dhabi DRS zones

Abu Dhabi DRS zones

The Abu Dhabi Grand Prix will feature two instances of the Drag Reduction System per lap.

The activation zones will be placed on the two longest straights on the track, each activated about a third of the way through each of the straights.

Unusually, the second DRS zone, occuring after Turn 9, will have the detection zone after the previous corner.

DRS zone on main straight for Suzuka

DRS details for the Japanese Grand Prix

DRS details for the Japanese Grand Prix

The main straight will play host to the DRS zone for this weekend’s Japanese Grand Prix.

The detection zone will be located just after the 130R corner, meaning chasing drivers will have to push hard to stay within the one second limit.

The DRS activation point begins after the final chicane, and cuts out just before the turning/braking point for Turn 1.

Two independent DRS zones for Monza

Monza is expected to have two independent DRS zones per lap

Monza is expected to have two independent DRS zones per lap

The FIA is planning to use two DRS zones for the Italian Grand Prix – each with its own detection zone.

The Canadian Grand Prix saw the debut of double DRS zones, but both were activated by the same detection zone, which many believed gave an unfair advantage.

With this, a seperate detection zone for each area was improvised. It is believed that the DRS zones will be on the start/finish straight, and the straight from 2nd Lesmo to the Ascari chicane.

The extreme low-downforce nature of Monza means that the effect of DRS will be smaller compared to other races, but it is believed to be still significant.

As opposed to Jenson Button’s high-downforce strategy last year (utilising the F-duct), most teams are expected to run minimally angled rear wings.

FIA bans DRS for Eau Rouge corner

After speculation earlier today, the FIA has announced that the Drag Reduction System will be banned for the Eau Rouge corner.

The DRS system will be blocked from after the La Source hairpin (Turn 1) all the way until the exit of Radillion (second half of Eau Rouge).

However, it has also emerged that this is not just a driver issue. Team engineers have noted that the open rear wing would not be able to close if a driver hit the brakes through Eau Rouge. This would apparently lead to the rear wing possibly becoming stuck open for the rest of the lap. This issue is believed to be because of Eau Rouge’s high downforce/speed/incline combination.

Also, going far too quickly through Eau Rouge can lead to massive crashes – see Jacques Villeneuve and Ricardo Zonta in 1999 (both drivers had agreed to take the corner flat out before the qualifying session).

The DRS zone for the race will be placed after Radillion, and will continue on until the Les Combes complex.

 

DRS ban for Eau Rouge?

Eau Rouge, an extremely steep corner on the Spa circuit

Eau Rouge, an extremely steep corner on the Spa circuit

The FIA is investigating whether the Drag Reduction System is suitable to be used at the Eau Rouge corner in Spa-Francorchamps.

DRS was banned earlier this year in the tunnel in Monaco, after several drivers noted that some might take unnecessary risks through the right-hand kink.

The same reasoning applies here. Eau Rouge is a famous high-incline corner, which is taken flat out in the dry conditions, like the Monaco tunnel. However, the risk of a crash here is also high, according to Rubens Barrichello:

"We’re going to see crashes going on, and that’s not the purpose.

"You’re going to gamble. I mean, last year we had to raise the knee to make it 
work [referring to F-duct system], and I went through Eau Rouge with one leg, and 
that’s not the purpose."

According to Mercedes, the DRS system may be used for up to 63% of the Spa circuit, second only to Monza.

Single DRS zone remains for Nurburgring

The Nurburgring features DRS approaching the Veedol chicane

The Nurburgring features DRS approaching the Veedol chicane

One DRS zone will be used at the German Grand Prix this weekend.

The activation zone will be on the back straight, approaching the Veedol chicane. In previous years, drivers have attempted passes, but nearly always fell short.

The detection point will be at the approach to Turn 10 – the Kumho-Kurve. Drivers will be then able to open the rear wing exiting Turn 11 – the Bit-Kurve.

As in previous races, DRS will remain open until the braking point of the Veedol chicane.

The Nurburgring has proven difficult in terms of passing in recent years. Hopefully, with Pirelli tyres and a decent DRS zone, that will change this weekend.

DRS zone on Wellington Straight for Silverstone

One straight will be used for DRS in Silverstone

One straight will be used for DRS in Silverstone

One single DRS zone will be used for the British Grand Prix.

The activation zone will feature for the entire Wellington Straight, the back straight section that was added in renovations last year.

It will continue on until the braking zone of Turn 6 (corner numbers were changed after relocation of pit straight). The detection area will be in the braking zone of Village (Turn 3).

This DRS location will give drivers the opportunity to use DRS through the Turn 4 kink all throughout the weekend, so expect to see Red Bull making full use of this feature.

Double DRS remains for Valencia

Two seperate DRS zones will be used in Valencia

Two seperate DRS zones will be used in Valencia

Two uses of the Drag Reduction System zones are to be retained for the European Grand Prix in Valencia. However, the use of only one detection point is also to remain.

The detection area will be 130 metres before Turn 8. However, in this weekend’s case, the two DRS zones will be further away from each other. The first activation area starts 285 metres after Turn 10, and is expected to last for the rest of the back straight.

The second zone occurs after a series of slow corners, 35 metres after Turn 14. While the end points have not yet been announced, it is suspected that this zone will also run the length of the second back straight.

While it eventually didn’t come to light because of the rain, the use of double DRS in Canada caused concern among many, amid fears that a driver who used DRS to pass could easily move away at the next activation zone.

Here in Valencia, where rain is a minimal possibility, and the DRS zones are further apart, this risk will be amplified.

2 DRS zones with 1 detection point for Canada

There will be 2 DRS zones in Canada

There will be 2 DRS zones in Canada

The FIA has confirmed that drivers will be allowed to use Drag Reduction System in two locations for the Canadian Grand Prix.

However, both zones will be served by only one detection point, situated just before L’Epingle hairpin.

The two DRS zones are almost right next to each other. The first activation zone is on the back straight (approx. 800 metres), and the second is the entire length of the pit straight, just one corner later.

As these two zones are close together, the advantage will be hugely in favour of car behind. If it is able to pass before the final hairpin, then the second DRS zone will give the driver a clear lead into the first corner of each lap.

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