Korean GP will break rules even if it goes ahead

It has emerged today that even if the Korean Grand Prix event does go ahead this year, which is slightly doubtful to say the least, the FIA would be forced to break its own rules to allow it to do so. While the track organisers are releasing new photos of developed buildings, it still isn’t enough to quell the doubt of many F1 fans and the teams.

One of the new Korean GP buildings - just in time?

One of the new Korean GP buildings - just in time?

It has been accepted that if the venue fails to host a Grand Prix this year, it will be barred from doing so in 2011. To be honest, the chances of it going ahead this year are still doubtful. Karun Chandhok’s demonstration run in a Red Bull, scheduled to take place on the 4th-5th September in only a few days time, is in serious doubt, with a trusted source saying that an FIA official said that there was “no way” this could happen.

Even more worrying is the FIA’s Appendix O to the International Sporting Code, which states that the final inspection of the track must take place 90 days before the opening of the venue. With the race weekend beginning on Friday (possibly Thursday, depending on whether it is an official opening day or not), then the final inspection should have taken place on July 23rd.

Clearly, the track wasn’t developed back then, and FIA rules state that an inspection would be very stringent, and therefore the track couldn’t have passed it, even if it took place. The rule reads as follows:

"...Inspection all work relating to the track surface, permanent 
features and safety installations should be completed to the 
FIA’s satisfaction.”

An incomplete track surface can't exactly be up to the FIA's satisfaction can it? Never mind "permanent features and safety installations", which wouldn't seem to be in place either.

While all the officials and FIA heads will insist the race will go ahead, you can't help but feel that they are delaying the inevitable. Bernie Ecclestone would never throw in the towel early, and is probably pushing the FIA to get this race done, but financial (and sporting) implications will be severe if the Korean GP is scrapped with days to go. Having said that, the organisers will still have to pay up if it doesn't go ahead, so Bernie's pocket is still covered.

It is understood that if the Korean GP fails to materialise, the job of handing out the punishments goes to the World Motor Sport Council and not Jean Todt. Either way, this isn't the last we will hear of this story.

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